THE BELLFURIES Sunday September 27th 8pm $10

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http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2156080

08/03/2015 Guitar World, Article , ‘Five “Modern Throwback” Artists Who Turn Retro-Inspired Music Into Something New’

“Loving Arms,” the opening track from Workingman’s Bellfuries (check it out below), starts off like a super-catchy slice of modern, melodic pop—until the glorious 16-second mark. That’s when the guitars, standup bass and drums enter the sonic picture, and the song gets even catchier.

That’s also the moment when everything falls into place, and you realize you’re hearing a truly modern, original take on rockabilly. Let’s call it rockabilly pop.

The Bellfuries released an undisputed modern-rockabilly masterpiece, Just Plain Lonesome, in 2001. A few years later, they followed it up with Palmyra, a full-on folk-ish rock/pop album that had rockabilly fans scratching their Layrite-coated heads.

This time around, the Bellfuries have steered the ship at least partially back toward roots-rock territory, turning in another winner. Perhaps Static put it best, calling it “contemporary rock-n-roll that’s the cat’s pajamas.”

“We’re a rock and roll band,” says Joey Simeone, the Texas-based band’s vocalist and chief songwriter. “People are obsessed with categories, sub-genres. We check into a hotel, and the guy or girl behind the desk asks what kind of music we play. ‘Rock and roll.’ Then they ask what I mean by that. Well…

“Let’s see. There’s elements of country music, rhythm and blues. There’s some improvisation on stage that I guess you could say is jazz-inspired. Throw in some gospel…plenty of melodies coming out of older pop tunes. That adds up to rock and roll, last time I checked. If we’re not re-inventing the wheel, I’d rather get to work than worry about renaming it.”

There’s an undeniable Beatles influence on Workingman’s Bellfuries, which is underscored by a rocking new cover of Lennon/McCartney’s “She’s a Woman.” In fact, “Loving Arms” seems—lyrically, at least—to be based on Arthur Alexander’s “Soldier of Love,” which the Beatles recorded for the BBC in the early Sixties.

08/03/2015 Guitar World, Article , ‘Five “Modern Throwback” Artists Who Turn Retro-Inspired Music Into Something New’

 

“Loving Arms,” the opening track from Workingman’s Bellfuries (check it out below), starts off like a super-catchy slice of modern, melodic pop—until the glorious 16-second mark. That’s when the guitars, standup bass and drums enter the sonic picture, and the song gets even catchier.

That’s also the moment when everything falls into place, and you realize you’re hearing a truly modern, original take on rockabilly. Let’s call it rockabilly pop.

The Bellfuries released an undisputed modern-rockabilly masterpiece, Just Plain Lonesome, in 2001. A few years later, they followed it up with Palmyra, a full-on folk-ish rock/pop album that had rockabilly fans scratching their Layrite-coated heads.

This time around, the Bellfuries have steered the ship at least partially back toward roots-rock territory, turning in another winner. Perhaps Static put it best, calling it “contemporary rock-n-roll that’s the cat’s pajamas.”

“We’re a rock and roll band,” says Joey Simeone, the Texas-based band’s vocalist and chief songwriter. “People are obsessed with categories, sub-genres. We check into a hotel, and the guy or girl behind the desk asks what kind of music we play. ‘Rock and roll.’ Then they ask what I mean by that. Well…

“Let’s see. There’s elements of country music, rhythm and blues. There’s some improvisation on stage that I guess you could say is jazz-inspired. Throw in some gospel…plenty of melodies coming out of older pop tunes. That adds up to rock and roll, last time I checked. If we’re not re-inventing the wheel, I’d rather get to work than worry about renaming it.”

There’s an undeniable Beatles influence on Workingman’s Bellfuries, which is underscored by a rocking new cover of Lennon/McCartney’s “She’s a Woman.” In fact, “Loving Arms” seems—lyrically, at least—to be based on Arthur Alexander’s “Soldier of Love,” which the Beatles recorded for the BBC in the early Sixties.

08/03/2015 Guitar World, Article , ‘Five “Modern Throwback” Artists Who Turn Retro-Inspired Music Into Something New’

 

“Loving Arms,” the opening track from Workingman’s Bellfuries (check it out below), starts off like a super-catchy slice of modern, melodic pop—until the glorious 16-second mark. That’s when the guitars, standup bass and drums enter the sonic picture, and the song gets even catchier.

That’s also the moment when everything falls into place, and you realize you’re hearing a truly modern, original take on rockabilly. Let’s call it rockabilly pop.

The Bellfuries released an undisputed modern-rockabilly masterpiece, Just Plain Lonesome, in 2001. A few years later, they followed it up with Palmyra, a full-on folk-ish rock/pop album that had rockabilly fans scratching their Layrite-coated heads.

This time around, the Bellfuries have steered the ship at least partially back toward roots-rock territory, turning in another winner. Perhaps Static put it best, calling it “contemporary rock-n-roll that’s the cat’s pajamas.”

“We’re a rock and roll band,” says Joey Simeone, the Texas-based band’s vocalist and chief songwriter. “People are obsessed with categories, sub-genres. We check into a hotel, and the guy or girl behind the desk asks what kind of music we play. ‘Rock and roll.’ Then they ask what I mean by that. Well…

“Let’s see. There’s elements of country music, rhythm and blues. There’s some improvisation on stage that I guess you could say is jazz-inspired. Throw in some gospel…plenty of melodies coming out of older pop tunes. That adds up to rock and roll, last time I checked. If we’re not re-inventing the wheel, I’d rather get to work than worry about renaming it.”

There’s an undeniable Beatles influence on Workingman’s Bellfuries, which is underscored by a rocking new cover of Lennon/McCartney’s “She’s a Woman.” In fact, “Loving Arms” seems—lyrically, at least—to be based on Arthur Alexander’s “Soldier of Love,” which the Beatles recorded for the BBC in the early Sixties.

LOVIN ARMS    

 

FROG HOLLER August 28th 8pm at The Hangar $10

frog_holler_froghollerdotcom

Our favorite Pennsylvania band returns , this time at the Hangar.

Tickets on sale now

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2094210

   FROG HOLLER  SIGHT UNSEEN                                                                                                                 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeBbgqmvMJo

 

Robbie Fulks and Redd Volkaert July 19th 7pm $20

Fulks is a gifted guitarist, a soulful singer with an expressive honky-tonk tenor, and a natural performer. But what really sets him apart is his songwriting, which is one part artful country, one part artful sendup of country and one part a little of everything else… It’s sort of country meets David Lynch.”
- New York Times

Robbie is performing as a duo with Redd Volkaert, who succeeded Roy Nichols in Merle Haggard’s backing band, and is among the country’s top Telecaster guitar slingers. Volkaert has won a Grammy for Best Country Instrumentalhttp://http://

J D McPherson August 31st 8pm $20

 

 

JD_McPherson_bandSometimes the most American of settings can reveal the deepest artistic talents the world has ever known. Johnny Cash on the farms of Arkansas, Mike Ness on the mean streets of Los Angeles, and a skinny kid from the ghettos of Tupelo named Elvis who happened to be brimming with soul. JD Mcpherson is one of those talents cut from that same artistic cloth. Growing up in southern Oklahoma, Mcpherson, the progeny of an ex-military, farming father and “good word” preaching mother, Mcpherson had an intriguing childhood and those influences shine blissfully through his music. His sound is raw it feels old, like the hum of a 50′s convertible cruising the back roads of the Mississippi delta, but it’s new and innovative.While most kids from the sticks heros were rodeo stars and country singers, Mcpherson heard the liberal screech of The Talking Heads and Bad Brains and let it empower him. But the allure of the American Roots Music scene is what made his musical mouth salivate. The honest troubadours of song that roamed from honky tonks to back alley bar rooms that machine gunned a town every night,one song at a time

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/1790083

Parker Millsap July 14 8pm $10 advance $12 door

At only 21 years of age, Oklahoma native Parker Millsap is quickly making a name for himself with his captivating live performances, soulful sound, and character-driven narratives. Since the release of his self-titled debut album earlier this year, he has garnered a nomination for the Americana Music Association’s 2014 Emerging Artist of the Year and has received praise from The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, American Songwriter, The Boston Globe, and NPR, to name a few.

Parker grew up in the tiny town of Purcell (pop. 5,952), where he attended a Pentecostal church with his family three times a week for most of his youth. Though Parker doesn’t consider himself very religious these days, the experiences engraved upon him inform his songwriting. Blending that fire and brimstone preaching with rock, country, blues, and Waits-ian imagery, he has created a sound uniquely his own.

Parker first picked up an acoustic guitar at nine, then plugged in and went electric after getting into Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan, eventually starting a cover band, Fever in Blue, with classmate Michael Rose (who still plays with him today). After graduating high school, he moved to Northern California, where he interned at Prairie Sun Recording, the studio where Tom Waits recorded Bone Machine and Mule Variations. Returning to Oklahoma, he put down the electric guitar and got into songwriting, releasing an indie album, Palisade, which he sold from the back of his van.

A trip to Nashville found Parker playing at the Tin Pan South songwriter’s festival, where his performance impressed Old Crow Medicine Show’s manager so much that he invited Parker to open a string of dates for the band, later leading to a slot on their prestigious New Year’s Eve gig at the Ryman Auditorium. Parker has also opened dates for Patty Griffin, Shovels & Rope, Lake Street Dive, and fellow Oklahoma blues-rocker John Fullbright.

“I like to set goals for myself that are impossible to reach,” he explains. “That way, I always have something to aim for, a better song, different characters, new stories. I just want to pay the bills and feed my dog, and maybe buy a new guitar every now and then. That’s all I need. I don’t want to be Elvis Presley, but I wouldn’t complain if a million girls screamed for me, either. Just don’t tell my girlfriend that.” Parker Millsap is ready to share his Oklahoma roots with the rest of the country, and, hopefully, the world.

 

- See more at: http://www.parkermillsap.com/bio/#sthash.zXtHuYwn.dpuf

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/1761509

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TUESDAY JUNE 16 7:30 PM AT THE HANGAR 675 RIVER ST TROY

.com/event/http://www.brownpapertickets1586296

http://www.hillbenders.com

▶ Pinball Wizard-The HillBenders record The Who’s ‘Tommy’ in it’s entirety – YouTube

You haven’t heard “Acid Queen” until you’ve seen it sung by a bearded man with a mandolin. Covering the Who’s Tommy in its entirety as a “bluegrass opry” for an enthusiastic rain-soaked crowd in the backyard of Threadgill’s on Saturday was a genius move (and a much better idea than having Ken Russell direct 1975’s Tommy movie). They faithfully replicated the songs, even giving short synopses of the plot at key points, but embellished them with banjo, mandolin and dobro to give the music an extra moonshine kick. The HillBenders, a talented five-piece band from Missouri, proved to be the perfect group to execute this “Whograss” concept