THE BELLFURIES Sunday September 27th 8pm $10

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http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2156080

08/03/2015 Guitar World, Article , ‘Five “Modern Throwback” Artists Who Turn Retro-Inspired Music Into Something New’

“Loving Arms,” the opening track from Workingman’s Bellfuries (check it out below), starts off like a super-catchy slice of modern, melodic pop—until the glorious 16-second mark. That’s when the guitars, standup bass and drums enter the sonic picture, and the song gets even catchier.

That’s also the moment when everything falls into place, and you realize you’re hearing a truly modern, original take on rockabilly. Let’s call it rockabilly pop.

The Bellfuries released an undisputed modern-rockabilly masterpiece, Just Plain Lonesome, in 2001. A few years later, they followed it up with Palmyra, a full-on folk-ish rock/pop album that had rockabilly fans scratching their Layrite-coated heads.

This time around, the Bellfuries have steered the ship at least partially back toward roots-rock territory, turning in another winner. Perhaps Static put it best, calling it “contemporary rock-n-roll that’s the cat’s pajamas.”

“We’re a rock and roll band,” says Joey Simeone, the Texas-based band’s vocalist and chief songwriter. “People are obsessed with categories, sub-genres. We check into a hotel, and the guy or girl behind the desk asks what kind of music we play. ‘Rock and roll.’ Then they ask what I mean by that. Well…

“Let’s see. There’s elements of country music, rhythm and blues. There’s some improvisation on stage that I guess you could say is jazz-inspired. Throw in some gospel…plenty of melodies coming out of older pop tunes. That adds up to rock and roll, last time I checked. If we’re not re-inventing the wheel, I’d rather get to work than worry about renaming it.”

There’s an undeniable Beatles influence on Workingman’s Bellfuries, which is underscored by a rocking new cover of Lennon/McCartney’s “She’s a Woman.” In fact, “Loving Arms” seems—lyrically, at least—to be based on Arthur Alexander’s “Soldier of Love,” which the Beatles recorded for the BBC in the early Sixties.

08/03/2015 Guitar World, Article , ‘Five “Modern Throwback” Artists Who Turn Retro-Inspired Music Into Something New’

 

“Loving Arms,” the opening track from Workingman’s Bellfuries (check it out below), starts off like a super-catchy slice of modern, melodic pop—until the glorious 16-second mark. That’s when the guitars, standup bass and drums enter the sonic picture, and the song gets even catchier.

That’s also the moment when everything falls into place, and you realize you’re hearing a truly modern, original take on rockabilly. Let’s call it rockabilly pop.

The Bellfuries released an undisputed modern-rockabilly masterpiece, Just Plain Lonesome, in 2001. A few years later, they followed it up with Palmyra, a full-on folk-ish rock/pop album that had rockabilly fans scratching their Layrite-coated heads.

This time around, the Bellfuries have steered the ship at least partially back toward roots-rock territory, turning in another winner. Perhaps Static put it best, calling it “contemporary rock-n-roll that’s the cat’s pajamas.”

“We’re a rock and roll band,” says Joey Simeone, the Texas-based band’s vocalist and chief songwriter. “People are obsessed with categories, sub-genres. We check into a hotel, and the guy or girl behind the desk asks what kind of music we play. ‘Rock and roll.’ Then they ask what I mean by that. Well…

“Let’s see. There’s elements of country music, rhythm and blues. There’s some improvisation on stage that I guess you could say is jazz-inspired. Throw in some gospel…plenty of melodies coming out of older pop tunes. That adds up to rock and roll, last time I checked. If we’re not re-inventing the wheel, I’d rather get to work than worry about renaming it.”

There’s an undeniable Beatles influence on Workingman’s Bellfuries, which is underscored by a rocking new cover of Lennon/McCartney’s “She’s a Woman.” In fact, “Loving Arms” seems—lyrically, at least—to be based on Arthur Alexander’s “Soldier of Love,” which the Beatles recorded for the BBC in the early Sixties.

08/03/2015 Guitar World, Article , ‘Five “Modern Throwback” Artists Who Turn Retro-Inspired Music Into Something New’

 

“Loving Arms,” the opening track from Workingman’s Bellfuries (check it out below), starts off like a super-catchy slice of modern, melodic pop—until the glorious 16-second mark. That’s when the guitars, standup bass and drums enter the sonic picture, and the song gets even catchier.

That’s also the moment when everything falls into place, and you realize you’re hearing a truly modern, original take on rockabilly. Let’s call it rockabilly pop.

The Bellfuries released an undisputed modern-rockabilly masterpiece, Just Plain Lonesome, in 2001. A few years later, they followed it up with Palmyra, a full-on folk-ish rock/pop album that had rockabilly fans scratching their Layrite-coated heads.

This time around, the Bellfuries have steered the ship at least partially back toward roots-rock territory, turning in another winner. Perhaps Static put it best, calling it “contemporary rock-n-roll that’s the cat’s pajamas.”

“We’re a rock and roll band,” says Joey Simeone, the Texas-based band’s vocalist and chief songwriter. “People are obsessed with categories, sub-genres. We check into a hotel, and the guy or girl behind the desk asks what kind of music we play. ‘Rock and roll.’ Then they ask what I mean by that. Well…

“Let’s see. There’s elements of country music, rhythm and blues. There’s some improvisation on stage that I guess you could say is jazz-inspired. Throw in some gospel…plenty of melodies coming out of older pop tunes. That adds up to rock and roll, last time I checked. If we’re not re-inventing the wheel, I’d rather get to work than worry about renaming it.”

There’s an undeniable Beatles influence on Workingman’s Bellfuries, which is underscored by a rocking new cover of Lennon/McCartney’s “She’s a Woman.” In fact, “Loving Arms” seems—lyrically, at least—to be based on Arthur Alexander’s “Soldier of Love,” which the Beatles recorded for the BBC in the early Sixties.

LOVIN ARMS    

 

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